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Santalum Spicatum (Australian Sandalwood) Oil

Used with care
Santalum Spicatum (Australian Sandalwood) Oil

Santalum Spicatum (Australian Sandalwood) Oil

Santalum spicatum wood oil is a pale yellow essential oil with a dry woody-spice aroma, derived from the wood of the Western Australian Sandalwood (Santalum spicatum). We use this ingredient as a fragrance component in some of our products.

Santalum spicatum is a type of sandalwood tree native to parts of Western Australia. These slow-growing trees reach heights of 3 - 10 meters tall, with grey-green foliage and small orange-brown fruit. The aromatic heartwood is prized for its fragrance and can undergo solvent extraction or steam distillation to produce the essential oil.

Santalum spicatum has been a desirable export for incence production since the 1850s, however continuous harvesting and its slow natural growth has led to considerable decline of wild populations in Western Australia. It has been classed as ‘vulnerable’ on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Recent efforts have been undertaken by the industry and WA state government to establish plantations and encourage active regeneration of the species through sowing seeds in native stands, while combating illegal harvesting.

Santalum spicatum oil contains a small percentage of the constituent farnesol, which is a known allergen for a small percentage of people. The International Fragrance Association (IFRA) publish guidelines for the safe use of this constituent, with restriction limits in the finished product - which our products are well below. The IFRA is a self-regulatory representative body of the fragrance industry, dedicated to promoting the safe use of fragrances.

Botanical name: Santalum spicatum

Other names: Santalum Spicata Oil; Sandalwood Oil, Australian

Chemical class: Essential Oils and Waters

Main constituents: alpha-Santalol, beta-Santalol, Farnesol


REFERENCES

Smith, Peta-Anne. (2019) Stimulation of Western Australian Sandalwood (Santalum spicatum) oil production using multiple treatments [thesis]. Edith Cowan University. https://ro.ecu.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3204&context=theses

Moniodis Jessie, Renton Michael, Jones Christopher G., Barbour E. Liz, Byrne Margaret (2018) Genetic and environmental parameters show associations with essential oil composition in West Australian sandalwood (Santalum spicatum). Australian Journal of Botany 66, 48-58. https://doi.org/10.1071/BT17116

TGSC Information System (2022). Sandalwood oil west australia (santalum spicatum). http://www.thegoodscentscompany.com/data/es1050241.html

Gowland, K. 2021. Santalum spicatum. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2021: e.T172724199A172724334. https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2021-3.RLTS.T172724199A172724334.en. Accessed on 10 March 2022.

International Fragrance Association Standard (2020). Farnesol. IFRA Standard, Amendment 49. https://ifrafragrance.org/standards/IFRA_STD_036.pdf

Forest Products Commission (2020). Western Australian sandalwood. https://www.wa.gov.au/organisation/forest-products-commission/western-australian-sandalwood

INCI Name:
Santalum Spicatum Wood Oil
Ingredient origins:
Western Australian Sandalwood
Role:
Fragrance
Common name:
Santalum Spicatum Wood Oil
EWG score: The EWG score is a hazard score ranging from 1-2 (low hazard), 3-6 (moderate hazard) and 7-10 (high hazard) published by the Environmental Working Group. Their data is sourced from the Skin Deep® database and studies published in open scientific literature.
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